Tagged: weather

The hottest place on Earth

Humans can survive in some pretty harsh conditions so long as we can stay hydrated. Still, I don’t think I’d want to find myself stranded in any of the world’s hottest places.

Waterspouts over the Adriatic Sea

The photo above shows an eye-popping complex of waterspouts observed over the Adriatic Sea on a boat trip toBrindisi, Italy. As we departed, the weather was very summer like — some humidity, hot and sunny. Cumuliform clouds developed during our excursion, but the weather didn’t appear threatening. In fact, the atmospheric pressurewas stable at 1024 millibars. Suddenly, we saw a line of funnel clouds straight in front of our boat! The photo shows the most recently formed waterspout in the foreground; the oldest spout, in the background, would disappear in a few seconds.

Predicting droughts in Africa

A drought alert system in Africa could contribute to preventing farms from collapsing as the risk of droughts increases with climate changes. And because the main issue remains the general lack of water, researchers are also analysing the management of water resources across the continent, looking for ways to improve both governance and cooperation between African regions.

A waterspout in Florida

What’s happening over the water? Pictured above is one of the better images yet recorded of a waterspout, a type of tornado that occurs over water. Waterspouts are spinning columns of rising moist air that typically form over warm water. Waterspouts can be as dangerous as tornadoes and can feature wind speeds over 200 kilometers per hour. Some waterspouts form away from thunderstormsand even during relatively fair weather. Waterspouts may be relatively transparent and initially visible only by an unusual pattern they create on the water. The above image was taken earlier this month nearTampa Bay, Florida. The Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida is arguably the most active area in the world for waterspouts, with hundreds forming each year. Some people speculate that waterspouts are responsible for some of the losses recorded in the Bermuda Triangle.

Thailand before and after flooding

In this true-colour satellite image, we see flooding in Ayutthaya and Pathum Thani Provinces in Central Thailand (right), compared to before the flooding (left).
The Chao Phraya River forms at the confluence of smaller rivers in central Thailand, and flows southward to the Gulf of Thailand. En route to the sea, the river passes through Ayutthaya. First established in the fourteenth century, Ayutthaya lies north of Thailand’s capital city of Bangkok, and the floods plaguing Thailand in October 2011 did not spare this historic city.